History of GCI Radar Station RAF Ripperston

Comically nicknamed a ‘Happidrome’ by the Airmen during the 1940’s, GCI RAF Radar Station Ripperston is just one mile from Pembrokeshire Coastal Path. The ‘Happidrome’ has been a part of our home since we moved here in 1998. The Set House, the first building in the photo below,  was the standby generator building for the former Radar Station at St Brides in Pembrokeshire.

Love Life! Love Pembrokeshire!

That was our first motto when we moved here to the tip of St Brides Bay in Pembrokeshire, nearly 20 years ago. It still is!

We also love everything about history and art and so, the HAPPIDROME being part of our home, we decided to give it the care and attention it deserved. We used the Set House name to call our site Set House Arts.

The rest is history itself and you can see the results of our endeavours on

‘History of Works’

Or read on, to read about

WWII History of what was a TOP SECRET, WWII GCI Radar Station, RAF Ripperston

We are continually adding to this page as we gather more and more information from our visitors, many of whom have tales to tell

Latest Update April 2018 – next large update May 2018 – exciting new info

aerial-map-19443_botder
GCI RAF RIPPERSTON -24th April 1944

We do also have Station Records from the archives which will be on show for visitors to browse through.

The following is just a snippet of the information we have to date –

The buildings themselves were built in 1942. However, the station became operational as a mobile unit as of 18:00 hours on September 10th, 1941. Manned by 50 personnel operating a ‘three watch’ system, RAF Ripperston was under the direct operational control of the Sector Station at RAF Fairwood Common. Ripperston’s task was to detect and plot enemy aircraft approaching the coasts of South West Wales, communicate the information to Fairwood Common via 10 Group Fighter Command at Rudloe Manor then work collectively with Fairwood Common to intercept enemy aircraft. It was in this manner that Ripperston and Fairwood Common worked together on February 17th, 1943. Two airborne Beaufighters intercepted and brought down three hostile Dornier Do 217’s which were on target to bomb Fairwood Common and Swansea.

Thanks for the generous help of Chris Morshead, the former curator the RAF Air Defense Radar Museum at Neatishead, Norfolk. Much also has been kindly given to us by Malcolm Cullen of Marloes and Steve Jones, author of Fallen Flyers.

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JaneEveDixon
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No Portion, Material, Image(s) or Text
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